Jeff Bezos is stepping down as Amazon CEO

Jeff Bezos, 57, writes letter to his 1.3m Amazon employees insisting he isn’t retiring and wants to focus on ‘passions’ including space and climate change as he steps down as CEO and hands reins to Andy Jassy

  • Bezos told staff he will become Executive Chair in the third quarter of this year 
  • Bezos announced the change in an email to staff on Tuesday afternoon and as the company reported bumper 2020 Q4 earnings of more than $100billion 
  • He said he wasn’t retiring but will ‘focus on the Day 1 Fund, the Bezos Earth Fund, Blue Origin, The Washington Post, and my other passions’ 
  • Throughout the whole of 2020, Amazon shares went up by 85%   
  • He founded Amazon with his ex-wife MacKenzie Bezos in 1994 on a road trip
  • The company is now worth $1.7trillion and Bezos is the richest man in the world 
  • Andy Jassy, current CEO of Amazon Web Services, will replace Bezos
  • Jassy, 53, was recently described by staff as a ‘shark’ who can ‘smell blood’ 
  • It was his decision to end AWS’ business with Parler, the unregulated social media site, after the January 6 Capitol riot 
  • Bezos didn’t explain the timing for the announcement but it comes as he faces increased scrutiny from Washington over Amazon’s business practices
  • Amazon has been plagued by antitrust investigations, calls for stricter sanctions and cutting questions over its treatment of workers amid the pandemic 

Jeff Bezos is stepping down as the CEO of Amazon, 27 years after founding it with his ex-wife and building it into one of the most successful companies of all time now worth $1.7 trillion.

Bezos, 57, announced the move in a letter to his 1.3 million Amazon employees Tuesday where he insisted he isn’t retiring but wants to focus on his ‘passions’ including his space and climate change ventures.  

He will be replaced by 53-year-old Andy Jassy, the current CEO of the Amazon empire cloud business Amazon Web Services (AWS) and the man behind the move to cancel Parler back in January. 

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Amazon founder Jeff Bezos (pictured with his girlfriend Lauren Sanchez) announced on Tuesday he was stepping down as CEO of the company later this year

Amazon founder Jeff Bezos (pictured with his girlfriend Lauren Sanchez) announced on Tuesday he was stepping down as CEO of the company later this year 

Bezos (in an undated photo) said he wasn't retiring but will 'focus on the Day 1 Fund, the Bezos Earth Fund, Blue Origin, The Washington Post, and my other passions'

Bezos (in an undated photo) said he wasn’t retiring but will ‘focus on the Day 1 Fund, the Bezos Earth Fund, Blue Origin, The Washington Post, and my other passions’

Bezos will be replaced by Amazon Web Services CEO, Andy Jassy

Bezos will be replaced by Amazon Web Services CEO, Andy Jassy

Jassy has been with the company for 24 years and built AWS into the $40billion, internet-dominating machine it now is. 

AWS dominates a third of the internet’s cloud business – by far the largest. It is how governments, companies and individuals keep data and operate online.  

Bezos will move to the role of Executive Chair where he says he wants to focus on ‘new products and initiatives’.   

It is not clear who will take over Jassy’s role at AWS and what the future holds for the cloud computing giant.  

The move will not happen until the third quarter of this year.  

Bezos didn’t explain the timing for the announcement on Tuesday but it comes as he faces increased scrutiny from Washington over Amazon’s business practices. 

The retail giant has been plagued by antitrust investigations, calls for stricter sanctions and cutting questions over its treatment of its workforce amid the pandemic.

Bezos himself was hauled before Congress in July to answer to accusations that Amazon, along with other big tech firms, was using their position to crush competition.  

JEFF BEZOS FULL EMAIL TO STAFF

Fellow Amazonians:

I’m excited to announce that this Q3 I’ll transition to Executive Chair of the Amazon Board and Andy Jassy will become CEO. In the Exec Chair role, I intend to focus my energies and attention on new products and early initiatives. Andy is well known inside the company and has been at Amazon almost as long as I have. He will be an outstanding leader, and he has my full confidence.

This journey began some 27 years ago. Amazon was only an idea, and it had no name. The question I was asked most frequently at that time was, ‘What’s the internet?’ Blessedly, I haven’t had to explain that in a long while.

Today, we employ 1.3 million talented, dedicated people, serve hundreds of millions of customers and businesses, and are widely recognized as one of the most successful companies in the world.

How did that happen? Invention. Invention is the root of our success. We’ve done crazy things together, and then made them normal. We pioneered customer reviews, 1-Click, personalized recommendations, Prime’s insanely-fast shipping, Just Walk Out shopping, the Climate Pledge, Kindle, Alexa, marketplace, infrastructure cloud computing, Career Choice, and much more. If you get it right, a few years after a surprising invention, the new thing has become normal. People yawn. And that yawn is the greatest compliment an inventor can receive.

I don’t know of another company with an invention track record as good as Amazon’s, and I believe we are at our most inventive right now. I hope you are as proud of our inventiveness as I am. I think you should be.

As Amazon became large, we decided to use our scale and scope to lead on important social issues. Two high-impact examples: our $15 minimum wage and the Climate Pledge. In both cases, we staked out leadership positions and then asked others to come along with us. In both cases, it’s working. Other large companies are coming our way. I hope you’re proud of that as well.

I find my work meaningful and fun. I get to work with the smartest, most talented, most ingenious teammates. When times have been good, you’ve been humble. When times have been tough, you’ve been strong and supportive, and we’ve made each other laugh. It is a joy to work on this team.

As much as I still tap dance into the office, I’m excited about this transition. Millions of customers depend on us for our services, and more than a million employees depend on us for their livelihoods. Being the CEO of Amazon is a deep responsibility, and it’s consuming. When you have a responsibility like that, it’s hard to put attention on anything else. As Exec Chair I will stay engaged in important Amazon initiatives but also have the time and energy I need to focus on the Day 1 Fund, the Bezos Earth Fund, Blue Origin, The Washington Post, and my other passions. I’ve never had more energy, and this isn’t about retiring. I’m super passionate about the impact I think these organizations can have.

Amazon couldn’t be better positioned for the future. We are firing on all cylinders, just as the world needs us to. We have things in the pipeline that will continue to astonish. We serve individuals and enterprises, and we’ve pioneered two complete industries and a whole new class of devices. We are leaders in areas as varied as machine learning and logistics, and if an Amazonian’s idea requires yet another new institutional skill, we’re flexible enough and patient enough to learn it.

Keep inventing, and don’t despair when at first the idea looks crazy. Remember to wander. Let curiosity be your compass. It remains Day 1.

Jeff 

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Bezos announced the change in an email to staff on Tuesday afternoon and as the company reported bumper 2020 Q4 earnings of more than $100billion. 

Throughout the whole of 2020, Amazon stocks rose by 85 percent. 

In the memo, Bezos insisted this ‘isn’t about retiring’ and said he was ‘excited about this transition’. 

He described the role he has occupied for almost three decades as ‘consuming’ and said it was ‘hard to put attention on anything else’. 

Bezos said he ‘will stay engaged in important Amazon initiatives but also have the time and energy I need to focus on the Day 1 Fund, the Bezos Earth Fund, Blue Origin, The Washington Post, and my other passions.’   

In the letter Bezos said: ‘Fellow Amazonians, I’m excited to announce that this Q3 I’ll transition to Executive Chair of the Amazon Board and Andy Jassy will become CEO. 

‘In the Exec Chair role, I intend to focus my energies and attention on new products and early initiatives.

‘Andy is well known inside the company and has been at Amazon almost as long as I have. He will be an outstanding leader and he has my full confidence. 

‘This journey began some 27 years ago. Amazon was only an idea, and it had no name. 

‘The question I was asked most frequently at that time was, ‘What’s the internet?’ Blessedly, I haven’t had to explain that in a long while.

‘Today, we employ 1.3 million talented, dedicated people, serve hundreds of millions of customers and businesses, and are widely recognized as one of the most successful companies in the world,’ he said.   

He signed off his email telling staff to ‘keep inventing’ and not be put off if the idea ‘looks crazy’.    

Bezos founded Amazon in 1994 on a road trip with his ex-wife MacKenzie. It made him the richest man in the world with a net worth of $188billion. 

He and Elon Musk trade the title depending on their respective companies’ success in the markets.

A 1999 60 Minutes interview shows Bezos in an office with a spray-painted amazon.com sign

A 1999 60 Minutes interview shows Bezos in an office with a spray-painted amazon.com sign

Amazon’s share price went up by 1.1 percent after the announcement but were not dramatically changed.  

Jassy, a married father-of-two and Harvard graduate, was recently hailed by Amazon employees as a decisive ‘shark’.  

‘He has a tremendous amount of trust in his team, but you have to be at the highest levels of diligence and preparation for any meeting with him. 

‘He’s a shark who will smell a drop of blood from 100 miles away if you’re not ready,’ one employee told Business Insider on January 31 in a profile about how he could become the next CEO. 

AWS is one of if not the most promising arm in the company. Since it was formed in 2003, Jassy has helped turn it into a $40bn hosting service for other online businesses.  

Analysts were calling Jassy and AWS the future of Amazon before Tuesday’s announcement. 

‘AWS and Jassy — they’re the gatekeepers. Jassy’s one of the most powerful leaders not just within the cloud and the tech sector but in the world of business,’ Dan Ives, an analyst at Wedbush Securities, said. 

Amazon shares were largely unaffected at the time of the announcement on Tuesday afternoon

Amazon shares were largely unaffected at the time of the announcement on Tuesday afternoon

Amazon's share price has grown hugely not only since Bezos and MacKenzie divorced but since the start of the pandemic. The company is worth more than $1.7trillion now

Amazon’s share price has grown hugely not only since Bezos and MacKenzie divorced but since the start of the pandemic. The company is worth more than $1.7trillion now 

Bezos founded Amazon in 1994 as an online market place for books. He is shown in 1997

Bezos founded Amazon in 1994 as an online market place for books. He is shown in 1997

Jeff and then-wife MacKenzie Bezos at Allen & Co in 2003

Jeff and then-wife MacKenzie Bezos at Allen & Co in 2003

WHAT’S NEXT FOR JEFF BEZOS?

In his memo to staff, Bezos insisted this ‘isn’t about retiring’ saying he ‘will stay engaged in important Amazon initiatives but also have the time and energy’ to focus on ‘new products and initiatives’ in his new role as Executive Chair.

Bezos cited a number of focuses he plans to turn his attention to: the Day 1 Fund, the Bezos Earth Fund, Blue Origin, The Washington Post, and ‘my other passions.’ 

Blue Origin  

Blue Origin is Bezos’s space tourism project which he launched back in 2000. 

Blue Origin has successfully used a single New Shepard Rocket six times.

The Amazon boss has been going head to head with rival Elon Musk to get his project off the ground ahead of his SpaceX but Blue Origin is yet to announce a date for the first crewed mission. 

The Day 1 Fund  

Bezos set up his $2 billion philanthropic endeavor the Day 1 Fund with ex-wife MacKenzie back in 2018. 

The fund was set up to fund existing non-profits that help families experiencing homelessness, and to  create a network of new, non-profit tier-one preschools in low-income communities.

Included in it is the Day 1 Families Fund which gives annual leadership awards to organizations and groups that provide shelter and support to families facing homelessness.

There is also the Day 1 Academies Fund – a ‘network of high-quality, full-scholarship Montessori-inspired preschools in underserved communities’. 

The Bezos Earth Fund  

The Bezos Earth Fund is the name of the $10 billion venture launched in February 2020 to invest in scientists, activists and other organizations with the aim of tackling climate change. 

The Washington Post

Bezos bought the newspaper in 2013 after being approached by the son of  the Post’s publisher Katharine Graham.

He helped turn around the struggling business, doubling its web traffic in just three years.

Bezos has since described the move as ‘one of the things I’m most proud of’.

‘When I’m 90, it’s going to be one of the things I’m most proud of, that I took on the Washington Post and helped them through a very rough transition,’ he said in 2018.

‘Other passions’ 

  • Self-driving cars – In June 2020,  Amazon acquired self-driving-taxi company Zoox, making a move into the self-driving car industry. 
  • Internet satellite programs – Amazon’s Project Kuiper is the plan to launch more than 3,000 internet satellites into low Earth orbit.
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Inside the company, he is widely known for ‘the Chop’ – the conference room next to his office and the term for his brainstorming meetings where big ideas and employees get chopped down to size, sources told Insider.  

It was his decision to end Amazon’s business with Parler, an unregulated social media site favored by the alt-right that was used, in part, to orchestrate the January 6 Capitol riot. 

Amazon has said booting Parler from the web was a ‘last resort’ after the app was ‘unwilling’ to ‘remove content that incites and plans the rape, torture and assassination of named public officials’. 

The ban shone a greater spotlight on the ongoing conversation around the power of big tech and led to Parler suing the web host for antitrust violations.  

Joining back in 1997 – the same year the company went public – Jassy quickly rose up the ranks at Amazon. 

Before taking the helm of AWS, he served as Bezos’ ‘shadow’ advisor and joined in every one of his meetings. 

He earned $20million over the last three years, according to Insider.   

Bezos founded Amazon as an online bookstore in 1994, before the internet was widely used.  

He told his wife about the idea while they were driving from New York City to Seattle. They’d been married for a year and had quit their jobs at law firms.  

MacKenzie later recalled in an interview: ‘I’m not a businessperson. So to me, what I’m hearing when he tells me that idea is the passion and the excitement.

‘And to me, you know, watching your spouse, somebody that you love, have an adventure — what is better than that, and being part of that?’

She started working as an accountant and was one of the first Amazon employees.  

They started by forming contracts with book stores like Barnes & Noble to sell their books online, then added from there. 

Now, it is the single largest online retail marketplace in the world.

Amazon Web Services has emerged as one of biggest profit centers for the ecommerce giant, with the cloud business making up over 60 percent of Amazon’s operating profits and generating over $40 billion in revenue each year. 

Prior to Tuesday’s announcement, speculation has been mounting for years that Amazon would spin off AWS into a separate business.   

Wall Street investors have for some time believed AWS could do better broken off from Amazon and away from the increased scrutiny around the retail giant’s anti-trust suits. 

With Jassy’s promotion, the future of AWS including whether it will be spun off from Amazon and who will now take the helm, isn’t clear. 

But was is clear is that Jassy had become hot property in the tech industry in recent years, having previously been rumored to be in the running for the top jobs at both Microsoft and Uber. 

Meanwhile, Bezos has hit the headlines of late as both his personal and professional dealings have come under increased scrutiny. 

In January 2019, Bezos and MacKenzie announced they were divorcing after 25 years of marriage and four children after the National Enquirer revealed the tech entrepreneur had been having an affair with former news anchor Lauren Sanchez. 

Amazon Web Services has emerged as one of biggest profit centers for the ecommerce giant, with the cloud business making up over 60 percent of Amazon's operating profits and generating over $40 billion in revenue each year

Amazon Web Services has emerged as one of biggest profit centers for the ecommerce giant, with the cloud business making up over 60 percent of Amazon’s operating profits and generating over $40 billion in revenue each year

Jeff Bezos: The relentless pursuit of internet success

Speaking in a 1999 interview before The Dotcom Crash, Amazon’s out-going CEO Jeff Bezos said that it was ‘very easy to predict that there’s going to be lots of successful companies borne of the internet’.

He added, however, that at the time it was very hard to predict who those companies are going to be, and if Amazon.com was ‘not one of those important, lasting companies’, then ‘we will have nobody to blame but ourselves.’

At the time, Amazon.com was the darling of the Dotcom bubble, and in April 1999, the company’s market capitalization had passed $30 billion for the first time, having been founded by Bezos just five years earlier and operated from his Seattle garage.

Now, Amazon has a market capitalization just shy of $1.7 trillion, and controls nearly 40 percent of all e-commerce in the United States, makes forty-two percent of paper book sales and controls a third of the market for streaming.

The history of Amazon can be traced back to a decision taken by Bezos to leave an already lucrative position as vice-president of D. E. Shaw & Co., a Wall Street firm, and move to Seattle, Washington.

And so began Bezos relentless pursuit of internet success – an important word to the founder who purchased the domain name relentless.com and even considered naming his online story ‘Relentless’ before friends persuaded him otherwise.

He first drew up a list of 20 products that he could market online, and narrowed that list down to a further five, including  compact discs, computer hardware, computer software, videos, and books.

He eventually settled on books, due to the large global demand for literature, the low unit price and the huge variety of titles available. In 1994, the company was founded in Bezos’ rented garage in Bellevue, with a $250,000 investment from his parents.

Now, at 57, Bezos is worth around $197 billion – enough to pay his parents back 788,000 times over, and having founded an online bookstore, his business interests now include cloud computing, artificial intelligence, space travel, as well as owning the Washington Post newspaper.

He was born in Albuquerque, New Mexico on January 12, 1964, to a teenage mother acklyn Gise Jorgensen, and his biological father, Ted Jorgensen.

However, their marriage would only last less then a year, and when Besoz was 4 years old, his mother married Mike Bezos, a Cuban immigrant.

Early on, he showed an interest in engineering, turning his parents’ garage into a laboratory, and after he moved with his family to Miami, he developed a love of computers. He even started his first business in high school – the Dream Institute, an educational summer camp for fourth, fifth and sixth graders.

From humble beginnings, he went on to graduate summa cum laude from Princeton University in 1986, receiving a degree in computer science and electrical engineering, after which he worked at various Wall Street firms.

In Manhattan in 1990, he became D.E. Shaw’s youngest vice president, and two years later he met novelist MacKenzie Tuttle, who was a research associate at the firm.

The couple would go onto marry a year later, before they moved across country to Seattle where Bezos founded Amazon. Together, they have four children – three sons and a daughter adopted from China, and divorced in 2019, with MacKenzie receiving 25 percent of the couple’s Amazon stock, worth $35.6 billion.

But other than his business interests and very public divorce, his private life has been less well documented.

In 2003, he was involved in a helicopter crash in West Texas after the vehicle’s tail hit a tree. He suffered minor injuries and was discharged from hospital the same day. A known Sci-Fi fan, he also made an appearance in the movie Star Trek Beyond.

He has also been involved in politics behind the scenes, donating to a variety of causes including the campaign to legalise same-sex marriage.  

Up until the start of 2021, Bezos was the world’s richest man, before being over-taken on the Bloomberg Billionaires Index by Tesla founder and CEO Elon Musk. 

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The divorce split the company stocks, and made MacKenzie the richest woman in the world with a settlement of around $38billion.  

That nearly doubled throughout the COVID-19 pandemic as Amazon – one of the only retailers that could continue because of its online retail model – thrived. 

MacKenzie has put her ex-husband to shame in recent months with her charitable giving. 

Just last week she donated $25 million to United Way of Central Indiana – the largest donation ever given to the Indiana-based charity.

MacKenzie announced back in December her plans to donate $4.2 billion to 384 organizations across all 50 states, Puerto Rico and Washington, DC. 

Meanwhile, Bezos and his new beau Sanchez were embroiled in a lawsuit with Sanchez’s brother Michael Sanchez over intimate texts and images leaked to the Enquirer.

Michael sued Bezos in February 2019 accusing the 57-year-old and his security consultant, Gavin de Becker, of damaging his reputation by telling journalists that it was he who had leaked the naked photos of Bezos to the outlet.

In November Judge John P. Doyle of the Los Angeles County Superior Court dismissed the case, saying Sanchez’s allegations were relying heavily on hearsay. 

Bezos is now asking his girlfriend’s brother to pay his $1.7 million legal fees.   

Aside from his personal life, Bezos has also been faced with increased scrutiny over his professional life. 

Over the last four years, Bezos has, along with the rest of Silicon Valley, faced tougher criticism from governments around the world about monopolizing technology and the way the world depends on it. 

In July, he testified at Congress about Amazon’s practices, along with CEOs of Facebook, Apple and Google, and insisted that Amazon is not anti-competitive despite its market dominance.  

His appearance came after House lawmakers threatened to subpoena for his testimony after Amazon initially declined to commit his attendance.

Bezos ended up appearing voluntarily and defended the company’s business practices and approach to competition.    

Federal Trade Commission officials are also probing the company over its business practices in retail and cloud computing. 

Numerous antitrust investigations and suits are still ongoing against the ecommerce giant on both a state and federal level.  

Last month, Amazon was slapped with a fresh suit accusing the retail giant of fixing the price of e-books sold on its marketplace by making anticompetitive agreements with the ‘Big Five’ publishers.

The suit, filed in the US District Court of the Southern District of New York, claims Amazon entered into fix pricing agreements with Hachette, HarperCollins, Macmillan, Penguin-Random House and Simon & Schuster.

This enabled the publishers to increase prices by up to 30 percent and for Amazon to remain protected from price competition from rivals, the suit claims. 

The same month, Connecticut Attorney General William Tong also said his office had an ‘active and ongoing antitrust investigation’ into Amazon over e-book price agreements with publishers.  

Amazon has also come under fire over its treatment of its workers, particularly the staff working on the frontline of the pandemic in the fulfilment centers.  

While share prices skyrocketed amid the pandemic as stay-at-home orders sent consumers to order online, the retailer faced its biggest labor unrest in its history.

Hundreds of Amazon workers staged mass call outs in March and April claiming the company had placed warehouse staff at ‘increased risk and exposure’ to coronavirus. 

It also emerged in March that Bezos – along with other top executives – had offloaded shares just in time before the pandemic slashed their company values, saving themselves billions while workers across the US find themselves on the breadline. 

Bezos was the biggest seller, offloading $3.4 billion in shares in the first week of February, saving him a staggering $317 million than if he had kept the stock through to March 20.

It also saw the billionaire sell as much stock in that one week as he did in the whole of the prior year. 

Then there’s been mounting calls for Amazon to pay a larger tax share. 

It is not clear what impact the Biden administration will have on Amazon but Biden vowed on the campaign trail to reform labor laws and expand worker protections.  

In July, Bezos testified at Congress about Amazon's practices, along with other CEOs, and insisted that Amazon is not anti-competitive despite its market dominance

In July, Bezos testified at Congress about Amazon’s practices, along with other CEOs, and insisted that Amazon is not anti-competitive despite its market dominance

While share prices skyrocketed amid the pandemic as stay-at-home orders sent consumers to order online, the retailer faced its biggest labor unrest in its history (a walkout at an Amazon plant in NYC in March)

While share prices skyrocketed amid the pandemic as stay-at-home orders sent consumers to order online, the retailer faced its biggest labor unrest in its history (a walkout at an Amazon plant in NYC in March) 

Bezos’ right-hand man who’ll take over as Amazon CEO: Father-of-two Harvard grad Andy Jassy, 53, is worth more than $377M, founded web service that shut down Parler, is married to a fashion designer and holds meetings called ‘The Chop’

By Harriet Alexander For Dailymail.com 

He describes himself as an ‘experienced buffalo wings eater’ – a man so sports mad he built a sports bar in his basement he calls HelmetHeads, and part-bought his local hockey team.

His co-workers describe him as an unassuming and friendly boss, whose easygoing demeanor is belied by high professional expectations.

To the rest of the world, he is now only one thing: the soon-to-be CEO of Amazon.

When Jeff Bezos announced Andy Jassy was replacing him, Amazon observers were not surprised.

Bezos, 57, described his replacement as an Amazon stalwart; business insiders said his appointment was all-but secured when Bezos’s other deputy, Jeff Wilke, who ran Amazon’s retail business, announced in August that he was retiring.

‘Andy is well known inside the company and has been at Amazon almost as long as I have,’ said Bezos .

‘He will be an outstanding leader, and he has my full confidence.’

Jassy joined the franchise that owns the Seattle Kraken hockey team in 2018

Jassy joined the franchise that owns the Seattle Kraken hockey team in 2018

Taking over as CEO from the man who founded the company in 1994 from his garage in Seattle, turning it into a company worth almost $1 trillion, is not going to be easy.

David Larcker, a professor at Stanford Graduate School of Business who specializes in corporate governance surveyed 113 directors and 18 executive recruiters and compensation experts three years ago, and found that Bezos would be the most difficult CEO to replace among those of several major U.S. corporations.

Yet Jassy, 53, appears almost uniquely placed to take over the helm of what is, after Walmart, America’s second largest company.

Not only is he seen as Bezos’s right-hand-man, he is in charge of one of the most important areas of the business, Amazon Web Services (AWS). It is a role which has earnt him an estimated $377 million.

Furthermore, he is widely liked and respected.

‘He is authentic, genuine, empathetic,’ said Taimur Rashid, AWS former managing director of business development.

‘That’s the key thing I love about Andy.’

Jassy is ‘as down to earth as a CEO as you’re going to meet,’ one former employee told Insider .

Others agreed, yet also emphasized his toughness.

‘He doesn’t suffer foolishness,’ said Scott Chancellor, a former AWS director.

He told Insider: ‘People who don’t do their best in those meetings won’t get a second shot, at least not for a long time.’

Jassy’s current role is head of AWS, which he has helped build from the ground up since 2003, and now generates over $40 billion in annual revenue, and is responsible for over 60 per cent of Amazon’s operating profits, though its sales are just 13 per cent of the total.

AWS is seen as the leader in cloud computing, with over 30 per cent of market share.

Amazon Web Services has emerged as one of biggest profit centers for the ecommerce giant, with the cloud business making up over 60 percent of Amazon's operating profits and generating over $40 billion in revenue each year

Amazon Web Services has emerged as one of biggest profit centers for the ecommerce giant, with the cloud business making up over 60 percent of Amazon’s operating profits and generating over $40 billion in revenue each year

Jassy was the man responsible for pulling the plug on Parler, making the decision in a meeting session known as The Chop.

Parler was hosted on AWS: Jassy made the call to cut off the social-media app for its lax content-moderation policies, deciding they had not done enough to limit violent content.

The name comes from ‘Charterhouse of Parma,’ a book Jassy read in college. The Chop was originally an actual conference room, but now is shorthand for the meetings where Jassy holds his most important brainstorming and planning sessions.

The Chop is also where big ideas, and sometimes employees, go to get chopped down to size, according to people familiar with the company who spoke to Insider.

‘If you go to a Chop meeting with Andy, you better be ready,’ one former senior-level employee told Insider .

‘He has a tremendous amount of trust in his team, but you have to be at the highest levels of diligence and preparation for any meeting with him.

‘He’s a shark who will smell a drop of blood from 100 miles away if you’re not ready.’

And although he may not be a household name like Bezos, Jassy is highly rated within the tech community.

Before Microsoft appointed Satya Nadella as CEO in 2014, Jassy was approached by the then-CEO, Steve Ballmer, about taking the job, Insider reported.

Jassy was also rumored to be in the running for Uber’s CEO position shortly after Travis Kalanick stepped down in 2017.

Jassy grew up in Scarsdale, Westchester County, just north of New York City

His New Yorker father, Everett, was a senior partner in Dewey Ballantine in New York and chairman of the firm’s management committee.

His Detroit-born mother, Margery , was a trustee of Theaterworks/USA, a theater company for young audiences in New York.

Jassy followed his father to Harvard University, where he studied for his undergraduate and M.B.A. degrees.

Jassy and his wife Elana live in Seattle's Capitol Hill district in a mansion built in 1906

Jassy and his wife Elana live in Seattle’s Capitol Hill district in a mansion built in 1906

‘I took my last final exam at HBS, the first Friday of May in 1997 and I started Amazon next Monday,’ Jassy said in a Harvard Business School podcast in September.

‘No, I didn’t know what my job was going to be, or what my title was going to be. It was super important to the Amazon people that we come that Monday.’

Amazon at that point was a three-year-old company which had just gone public.

In August of that year he married Elana Rochelle Caplan, a fashion designer from Los Angeles.

The pair tied the knot in Santa Monica, at Loews Santa Monica Beach Hotel.

In October of this year they returned to their marital roots, buying a $6.7 million Cape Cod-style home in the beachside community.

Jassy and his wife, who works at clothing company Eddie Bauer, have two children: their main home is a five bedroom, six bathroom 10,000sq foot historic mansion in Seattle’s Capitol Hill district.

The stately manor, built in 1906, was bought by the Jassys in 2009 for a reported $3.15 million.

Elana Jassy in 2016 donated $250 to the presidential campaign of Bernie Sanders, a staunch Amazon critic.

The money, according to Insider , was donated in February 2016, during his primary contest against Hillary Clinton for the presidential nomination.

She then donated $750 to Clinton in July of that year, after she won the Democratic nomination.

In 2018 Sanders introduced the Stop BEZOS Act, that would have required large employers, such as Amazon, to pay the government an additional tax that would cover worker benefits. In October 2018 Bezos announced Amazon was raising its minimum wage to $15 an hour – a move which Sanders praised.

In September 2020, she donated $2,800 to now-President Joe Biden’s campaign, as well as to the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee and a group affiliated with the Democratic National Committee, according to FEC records. 

She has also donated to other high-profile Democrats, including former President Barack Obama and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

Andy Jassy has limited his donations to tens of thousands of dollars to the Amazon corporate political action committee, which contributes to both parties.

He appears to steer clear of politics, but has previously shown support for Supreme Court decisions that made it illegal to discriminate against LGBTQ people in the workplace and blocked former president Donald Trump’s bid to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program.

Jassy is described as a sports fanatic: his home, according to The Washington Post , has ‘an elaborate man cave for watching sports’.

He told GeekWire that he wanted a way to both watch football and hang out with his family on the weekends, so he built a sports bar.

Jassy co-owns the Seattle Kraken hockey team, fulfilling a childhood dream

Jassy co-owns the Seattle Kraken hockey team, fulfilling a childhood dream

‘It’s called HelmetHead,’ Jassy said, explaining the reference from a sports book called Personal Fouls.

‘We try to watch as many of the big sporting events as we can there.’

In 2018 he became part of a franchise that owns the Seattle Kraken hockey team, fulfilling a childhood dream.

‘It’s always been a dream of mine to be part of a group owning a sports team,’ he said at the time, buying into a franchise started by Top Gun and Pirates of the Caribbean producer Jerry Bruckheimer and billionaire investor David Bonderman, among others.

‘It really is thrilling and exciting for me.’

He told GeekWire his love for hockey started as a three-year-old, when his father would take him to New York Rangers hockey games.

When the opportunity to join Seattle Hockey Partners came up, he gladly came aboard, he said.

Jassy also has a football obsession, keenly following the New York Giants.

He describes himself on Twitter as a ‘big sports/music/film fan, experienced buffalo wings eater.’ 

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